IEEE TSIPN Article

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IEEE TSIPN Article

In this article, we explore the state-space formulation of a network process to recover from partial observations the network topology that drives its dynamics. To do so, we employ subspace techniques borrowed from system identification literature and extend them to the network topology identification problem.

We consider a specific graph learning task: reconstructing a symmetric matrix that represents an underlying graph using linear measurements. We present a sparsity characterization for distributions of random graphs (that are allowed to contain high-degree nodes), based on which we study fundamental trade-offs between the number of measurements, the complexity of the graph class, and the probability of error. 

Observability is a fundamental concept in system inference and estimation. This article is focused on structural observability analysis of Cartesian product networks. Cartesian product networks emerge in variety of applications including in parallel and distributed systems.

We consider the problem of learning a graph from a given set of smooth graph signals. Our graph learning approach is formulated as a constrained quadratic program in the edge weights. We provide an implicit characterization of the optimal solution and propose a tailored ADMM algorithm to solve this problem efficiently.

A central problem in analog wireless sensor networks is to design the gain or phase-shifts of the sensor nodes (i.e. the relaying configuration) in order to achieve an accurate estimation of some parameter of interest at a fusion center, or more generally, at each node by employing a distributed parameter estimation scheme.

In this paper, we propose a communication- and computation-efficient algorithm to solve a convex consensus optimization problem defined over a decentralized network. A remarkable existing algorithm to solve this problem is the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), in which at every iteration every node updates its local variable through combining neighboring variables and solving an optimization subproblem.

In this paper, we consider the problem of bandwidth-constrained distributed estimation of a Gaussian vector with linear observation model. Each sensor makes a scalar noisy observation of the unknown vector, employs a multi-bit scalar quantizer to quantize its observation, and maps it to a digitally modulated symbol.

Distributed machine learning algorithms enable learning of models from datasets that are distributed over a network without gathering the data at a centralized location. While efficient distributed algorithms have been developed under the assumption of faultless networks, failures that can render these algorithms nonfunctional occur frequently in the real world. 

In this paper, a multi-hypothesis distributed detection technique with non-identical local detectors is investigated. Here, for a global event, some of the sensors/detectors can observe the whole set of hypotheses, whereas the remaining sensors can either see only some aspects of the global event or infer more than one hypothesis as a single hypothesis.

We study the problem of distributed filtering for state space models over networks, which aims to collaboratively estimate the states by a network of nodes. Most of existing works on this problem assume that both process and measurement noises are Gaussian and their covariances are known in advance. In some cases, this assumption breaks down and no longer holds.

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