January 2019

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January, 2019

Volume 36 | Issue 1

The sliding discrete Fourier transform (SDFT) is an efficient method for computing the N-point DFT of a given signal starting at a given sample from the N-point DFT of the same signal starting at the previous sample [1]. However, the SDFT does not allow the use of a window function, generally incorporated in the computation of the DFT to reduce spectral leakage, as it would break its sliding property.

Speech, the expression of thoughts and feelings by articulating sounds, is an ability so taken for granted that few people bother to think about how complex and nuanced the process actually is. Yet, as more devices gain the ability to listen to and interpret what speakers are saying, speech and audiology technologies are attracting the interest of a growing number of academic researchers. Signal processing is now playing a critical role in making speech detection and recognition more accurate, flexible, and reliable for use in a wide range of research and everyday applications.

The Advertisers Index contained in this issue is compiled as a service to our readers and advertisers: the publisher is not liable for errors or omissions although every effort is made to ensure its accuracy. Be sure to let our advertisers know you found them through IEEE Signal Processing Magazine.

The Bio-Imaging and Signal Processing Technical Committee (BISP-TC) of the IEEE Signal Processing Society (SPS) promotes activities in the broad technical areas of computerized image and signal processing with a clear focus on applications in biology and medicine.
There have been three key revolutions in the way that research has become accessible: publishing, code, and data. The second and third revolutions are still taking place, particularly driven by the rise of machine-learning and artificial intelligence research in the last decade. When I started my research career in 1995, the World Wide Web was still in its infancy. The popular Netscape browser had just been launched. Search engines were not widely used. While many academics owned e-mail addresses, few had web pages. If they did, they were not kept current.
The title of this editorial is borrowed from a popular children’s lullaby from the 1800s, which reads “Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are!” It reminds me of the vast expanse of unexplored space (and science) that lie before us. 
 
The human race has always been fascinated by space - and who would not be? Its shining stars continually challenge us to get closer and unravel their mysteries. Civilizations old and new have been defined by their relationship with space and by their contribution to astronomy. 
 

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