Human Machine Interfaces in Upper-Limb Prosthesis Control: A Survey of Techniques for Preprocessing and Processing of Biosignals

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Human Machine Interfaces in Upper-Limb Prosthesis Control: A Survey of Techniques for Preprocessing and Processing of Biosignals

By: 
Chakaveh Ahmadizadeh; Mahta Khoshnam; Carlo Menon

Prostheses provide a means for individuals with amputations to regain some of the lost functions of their amputated limb. Human-machine interfaces (HMIs), used for controlling prosthetic devices, play a critical role in users' experiences with prostheses. This review article provides an overview of the HMIs commonly adopted for upper-limb prosthesis control and inspects collected signals and their processing methods.

Prostheses provide a means for individuals with amputations to regain some of the lost functions of their amputated limb. Human–machine interfaces (HMIs), used for controlling prosthetic devices, play a critical role in users’ experiences with prostheses. This review article provides an overview of the HMIs commonly adopted for upper-limb prosthesis control and inspects collected signals and their processing methods.

Motivation

In 2005, in just the United States, 1.6 million individuals were living with the loss of a limb, 35% of whom had undergone an amputation of the upper limb [1]. This number is expected to more than double by the year 2050 [1]. Traumatic causes have led to 57.7 million people worldwide living with limb amputations [2]. Amputations drastically affect an individual’s personal autonomy and degrade the quality of his or her daily life [3].

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