IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security

You are here

Top Reasons to Join SPS Today!

1. IEEE Signal Processing Magazine
2. Signal Processing Digital Library*
3. Inside Signal Processing Newsletter
4. SPS Resource Center
5. Career advancement & recognition
6. Discounts on conferences and publications
7. Professional networking
8. Communities for students, young professionals, and women
9. Volunteer opportunities
10. Coming soon! PDH/CEU credits
Click here to learn more.

Contactless fingerprint recognition is highly promising and an essential component in the automatic fingerprint identification system. However, due to the inherent characteristic of perspective distortions of contactless fingerprints, achieving a highly accurate contactless fingerprint recognition system is very challenging.

A problem deeply investigated by multimedia forensics researchers is that of detecting which device has been used to capture a video. This enables us to trace down the owner of a video sequence, which proves extremely helpful to solve copyright infringement cases as well as to fight distribution of illicit material (e.g., child exploitation clips and terroristic threats). 

Compressed sensing (CS) has recently emerged as an effective and efficient way to encrypt data. Under certain conditions, it has been shown to provide some secrecy notions. In theory, it could be considered to be a perfect match for constrained devices needing to acquire and protect the data with computationally cheap operations.

In many communication channels, secrecy constraints usually incur a penalty in capacity, as well as generalized degrees-of-freedom (GDoF). In this paper, we show an interesting observation that adding a helper can totally remove the penalty in sum GDoF for a two-user symmetric Gaussian interference channel. 

The Internet of Things (IoT) is increasingly empowering people with an interconnected world of physical objects ranging from smart buildings to portable smart devices, such as wearables. With recent advances in mobile sensing, wearables have become a rich collection of portable sensors and are able to provide various types of services...

The use of mobile phones in public places opens up the possibilities of remote side channel attacks on these devices. We present a video-based side channel attack to decipher passwords on mobile devices. Our method uses short video clips ranging from 5 to 10 s each, which can be taken unobtrusively from a distance and do not require the keyboard or the screen of the phone to be visible.

The procedure for extracting a cryptographic key from noisy sources, such as biometrics and physically uncloneable functions (PUFs), is known as fuzzy extractor (FE). Although FE constructions deal with discrete sources, most noisy sources are continuous. In the continuous case, it is required to transform the source to a discrete one. 

In this paper, the achievable secrecy rate of a relay-assisted massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) downlink is investigated in the presence of a multi-antenna active/passive eavesdropper. The excess degrees-of-freedom offered by a massive MIMO base-station (BS) are exploited for sending artificial noise (AN) via random and null-space precoders.

Spectrum auction is an effective approach to improve the spectrum utilization, by leasing an idle spectrum from primary users to secondary users. Recently, a few differentially private spectrum auction mechanisms have been proposed, but, as far as we know, none of them addressed the differential privacy in the setting of double spectrum auctions.

Constrained image splicing detection and localization (CISDL), which investigates two input suspected images and identifies whether one image has suspected regions pasted from the other, is a newly proposed challenging task for image forensics. In this paper, we propose a novel adversarial learning framework to learn a deep matching network for CISDL.

Pages

SPS on Twitter

SPS Videos


Signal Processing in Home Assistants

 


Multimedia Forensics


Careers in Signal Processing             

 


Under the Radar