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TASLP Featured Articles

We introduce the multiple enrollment scheme for SRAM-physical unclonable functions (PUFs). During each enrollment, the binary power-on values of the SRAM are observed, and a corresponding key and helper data are generated. Each key can later be reconstructed from an additional observation and the helper data.

There are a number of studies about extraction of bottleneck (BN) features from deep neural networks (DNNs) trained to discriminate speakers, pass-phrases, and triphone states for improving the performance of text-dependent speaker verification (TD-SV). However, a moderate success has been achieved.

Single-channel, speaker-independent speech separation methods have recently seen great progress. However, the accuracy, latency, and computational cost of such methods remain insufficient. The majority of the previous methods have formulated the separation problem through the time–frequency representation of the mixed signal, which has several drawbacks, including the decoupling of the phase...

One of the challenges in computational acoustics is the identification of models that can simulate and predict the physical behavior of a system generating an acoustic signal. Whenever such models are used for commercial applications, an additional constraint is the time to market, making automation of the sound design process desirable.

Deep neural networks (DNNs) have been proven to be powerful models for acoustic scene classification tasks. State-of-the-art DNNs have millions of connections and are computationally intensive, making them difficult to deploy on systems with limited resources. 

Neural networks have shown great potential in language modeling. Currently, the dominant approach to language modeling is based on recurrent neural networks (RNNs) and convolutional neural networks (CNNs). Nonetheless, it is not clear why RNNs and CNNs are suitable for the language modeling task since these neural models are lack of interpretability. 

One of the biggest challenges in multimicrophone applications is the estimation of the parameters of the signal model, such as the power spectral densities (PSDs) of the sources, the early (relative) acoustic transfer functions of the sources with respect to the microphones, the PSD of late reverberation, and the PSDs of microphone-self noise. 

The transfer of acoustic data across languages has been shown to improve keyword search (KWS) performance in data-scarce settings. In this paper, we propose a way of performing this transfer that reduces the impact of the prevalence of out-of-vocabulary (OOV) terms on KWS in such a setting.

Recently, the binaural auditory-model-based quality prediction (BAM-Q) was successfully applied to predict binaural audio quality degradations, while the generalized power-spectrum model for quality (GPSM q ) has been demonstrated to account for a large variety of monaural signal distortions.

The avoidance of spatial aliasing is a major challenge in the practical implementation of sound field synthesis. Such methods aim at a physically accurate reconstruction of a desired sound field inside a target region using a finite ensemble of loudspeakers. In the past, different theoretical treatises of the inherent spatial sampling process led to anti-aliasing criteria for simple loudspeaker array arrangements, e.g., lines and circles, and fundamental sound fields, e.g., plane and spherical waves. Many criteria were independent of the listener's position inside the target region.

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