TCI Volume 6 | 2020

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February, 2020

TCI Volume 6 | 2020

The modeling of phenomenological structure is a crucial aspect in inverse imaging problems. One emerging modeling tool in computer vision is the optimal transport framework. Its ability to model geometric displacements across an image's support gives it attractive qualities similar to optical flow methods that are effective at capturing visual motion, but are restricted to operate in significantly smaller state-spaces. 

Fusion based hyperspectral image (HSI) super-resolution method, which obtains a spatially high-resolution (HR) HSI by fusing a low-resolution (LR) HSI and an HR conventional image, has been a prevalent method for HSI super-resolution. One effective fusion based method is to cast HSI super-resolution into a unified optimization problem, where handcrafted priors such as sparse prior or low rank prior are always adopted to regularize the latent HR HSI to be optimized. 

The coded aperture snapshot spectral imager (CASSI) is a computational imaging system that acquires a three dimensional (3D) spectral data cube by a single or a few two dimensional (2D) measurements. The 3D data cube is reconstructed computationally. Binary on-off random coded apertures with square pixels are primarily implemented in CASSI systems to modulate the spectral images in the image plane.

Users of X-ray (micro-)CT in research environments often study many different types of objects, with many different research questions. For each new scan, the settings of the scan (number of angles, dose, cone angle) are chosen by the user, often based on how much time is available, the dose sensitivity of the sample, and geometrical characteristics of the particular CT-scanner that is used.

Sparsity and low-rank models have been popular for reconstructing images and videos from limited or corrupted measurements. Dictionary or transform learning methods are useful in applications such as denoising, inpainting, and medical image reconstruction.

Good temporal representations are crucial for video understanding, and the state-of-the-art video recognition framework is based on two-stream networks. In such framework, besides the regular ConvNets responsible for RGB frame inputs, a second network is introduced to handle the temporal representation, usually the optical flow (OF). 

Three-dimensional (3-D) radar imaging can provide additional information along elevation dimension about the target with respect to the conventional 2-D radar imaging, but usually requires a huge amount of data collected over 3-D frequency-azimuth-elevation space, which motivates us to perform 3-D imaging by using sparsely sampled data. Traditional compressive sensing (CS) based 3-D imaging methods with sparse data convert the 3-D data into a long vector, and then complete the sensing and recovery steps.

The challenges of real world applications of the laser detection and ranging (Lidar) three-dimensional (3-D) imaging require specialized algorithms. In this paper, a new reconstruction algorithm for single-photon 3-D Lidar images is presented that can deal with multiple tasks. 

In this paper, we present a full view optical flow estimation method for plenoptic imaging. Our method employs the structure delivered by the four-dimensional light field over multiple views making use of superpixels. These superpixels are four dimensional in nature and can be used to represent the objects in the scene as a set of slanted-planes in three-dimensional space so as to recover a piecewise rigid depth estimate.

Binary tomography is concerned with the recovery of binary images from a few of their projections (i.e., sums of the pixel values along various directions). To reconstruct an image from noisy projection data, one can pose it as a constrained least-squares problem.

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