Yicong Zhou (Tufts University), “Multimedia Security System for Security and Medical Applications” (2010)

You are here

Inside Signal Processing Newsletter Home Page

Top Reasons to Join SPS Today!

1. IEEE Signal Processing Magazine
2. Signal Processing Digital Library*
3. Inside Signal Processing Newsletter
4. SPS Resource Center
5. Career advancement & recognition
6. Discounts on conferences and publications
7. Professional networking
8. Communities for students, young professionals, and women
9. Volunteer opportunities
10. Coming soon! PDH/CEU credits
Click here to learn more.

10 years of news and resources for members of the IEEE Signal Processing Society

Yicong Zhou (Tufts University), “Multimedia Security System for Security and Medical Applications” (2010)

Yicong Zhou (Tufts University), “Multimedia Security System for Security and Medical Applications”, Advisor: Dr. Karen Panetta and Dr. Sos Agaian (2010)

Many applications require object recognition and multimedia security. However, images/videos in traditional recognition systems may have low quality and/or contain noise. Furthermore, those systems do not always have the function to protect the multimedia data. This thesis introduces a new multimedia security system for security and medical applications requiring object recognition and multimedia encryption.

Several algorithms are introduced to enhance CT baggage images for detecting threat objects, and for detecting cancer in mammograms and prostate MR images. The second-derivative-like measure of enhancement is introduced to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the enhancement algorithms. Novel parametric recursive sequences are developed and then integrated with bit-plane decomposition methods to protect multimedia data. Finally, the thesis introduces utilizing edge maps for image encryption.

For details, click here or contact the author.

Table of Contents:

Education & Resources

SPS on Twitter

SPS Videos


Signal Processing in Home Assistants

 


Multimedia Forensics


Careers in Signal Processing             

 


Under the Radar